Can the UK police tackle cybercrime? -TEISS® : Cracking Cyber Security
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Can the UK police tackle cybercrime?

Amidst the finery and opulence of the Mansion House interiors earlier this week, The Rt. Hon. the Lord Mayor Charles Bowman welcomed an audience to hear UK Police and cyber security experts discuss how the UK law enforcement is addressing the growing threat of cybercrime to UK businesses and critical national infrastructure.

At the launch of Verizon's 2018 Data Breach Investigations Report, Ian Dyson QPM, Commissioner, City of London Police, shared his insight on how the UK police are handling the ever expanding scale of cyber-attacks.

He stated that 70% of fraud is now cyber-enabled, with crypto mining and jacking among the top cybercrime trends, as well as social engineering.

With regards to latter, Commissioner Dyson described how young people, in particular, have chosen convenience over security when it comes to the data they share in order to use certain apps – which, yes, make life easier and more interesting with transport updates and restaurant recommendations – but essentially they’re giving away their data, unaware of how it’s being used. One example the Commissioner gave was people posting screenshots of their newly acquired driving licenses on Facebook; the risks are obvious.

Also of interest: About Verizon's 2018 Data Breach Investigations Report 

Despite the fears, Commissioner Dyson said the UK’s cyber security is in a better state than we might think, being 4th best in Europe.

However, he did point out that the City of London Police has a national responsibility around cybercrime protection.  He raised the need to create a security blanket to help businesses see that they’re protected; for which he proposed a plan that’s already working elsewhere in UK law enforcement.

This idea is based upon Project Griffin which was originally established by the City of London Police in 2004 to combat the rising levels of terrorism in a post 9/11 world. Its main goal was to foster security awareness across the capital’s business community through effective and timely information-sharing with law enforcement. The commissioner said that a lot can be learnt from Project Griffin and there’s a need to take those principles to cyber space.

The UK Police needs to act fast; Commissioner Dyson highlighted the fact that if your house is burgled, you would call the police. However, in a cyber-attack – you would more likely approach an I.T. team in the first instance.

Commissioner Dyson said it is crucial that UK law enforcement rethinks its approach to online crime, otherwise they risk becoming irrelevant.