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TheShadowBrokers, the hacker group behind WannaCry, has also threatened to dump data from banks as well as from nuclear and missile programmes.

IoT

WannaCry hackers promise more lethal cyber-attacks in June

Hackers behind the WannaCry ransomware attack have warned that they will launch more malicious codes in June to hack into more computers and phones around the world.

TheShadowBrokers, the hacker group behind WannaCry, have also threatened to dump data from banks as well as from nuclear and missile programmes.

While the effect of WannaCry ransomware didn't last very long, a group of hackers behind the malware have now threatened to release more malicious code to enable access to many more computers, software and smartphones around the world later this year.

WannaCry ransomware may have links to North Korea, researchers suggest

The "TheShadowBrokers Data Dump of the Month" in June claims to allow buyers to access data dumps from central banks using the SWIFT international money transfer network as well as data obtained from nuclear and missile programmes of countries like China, Russia, Iran and North Korea. At the same time, the group will release code for hacking into web browsers, routers and various handsets around the world.

The hacker group has, however, offered technology companies to buy back lost data by paying them in Bitcoin before June. If they don't, then the stolen data will be auctioned and given to the highest bidders.

Cracking the WannaCry attack

"In June, TheShadowBrokers is announcing "TheShadowBrokers Data Dump of the Month" service. TheShadowBrokers is launching new monthly subscription model. Is being like wine of month club. Each month peoples can be paying membership fee, then getting members only data dump each month. What members doing with data after is up to members," went a blog post authored by the hacker group.

Yesterday, a tweet by Neel Mehta, a security researcher at Google, suggested that the recent WannaCry ransomware may share an identical code with Cantopee, a malware used by the Lazarus group to attack systems around the globe last year. Researchers across the globe are now trying to find links between WannaCry and Cantopee to be able to preempt future ransomware attacks. North Korea-based Lazarus Group is said to be behind the WannaCry ransomware as well.

Russia faces brunt of WannaCry ransomeware attacks, terms it cyber-terrorism

"For now, more research is required into older version of WannaCry. We believe this might hold the key to solve some of the mysteries around this attack. One thing is for sure—Neel Mehta's discovery is the most significant clue to date regarding the origins of WannaCry," noted researchers at Kaspersky Labs.

While WannaCry only affected systems using older versions of Windows, the recent threat issued by the hacker group suggests that the codes it will use in June will be far more malicious. It remains to be seen how the likes of Microsoft and other security research firms will respond if the hacker group does carry out the threat in the near future.

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